Invited Speakers

Confirmed Invited Speakers include the following: 

Francis Duck DSc MBE

Francis Duck DSc MBE is a retired medical physicist. His career focussed on the medical uses of ultrasound. Since retirement he has developed an interest in the history of medical physics, and has published a number of articles on the topic. His book, Physicists and Physicians was published by the IPEM in 2013. A biography of Edith and Florence Stoney, written jointly with Adrian Thomas, has just been published.  He is Honorary Secretary of the British Society for the History of Radiology.

   

See the Abstract for Francis Duck's talk here.

 
 Angela Douglas MBE

Angela Douglas, a Consultant Clinical Scientist, is the Deputy Chief Scientific officer for NHS England. Angela has worked in the NHS in Genetics for over 38 years, is a Fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists, and an Honorary Fellow of the Academy for Healthcare Science.  Angela previously worked as the Scientific Director of the Cheshire and Merseyside Genetics Service, at Liverpool Women’s Hospital, for 22 years, where she was the Organisational Lead Healthcare Scientist, and more recently led the NW Coast GMC delivering the 100,000 Genome Project as the Clinical Programme Director.  In 2012, Angela was nominated as President of the British Society for Genetic Medicine, having previously been the Chairman of the ACC and the ACGS. Angela was a member of the working groups (Service Delivery, Innovation and Bioinformatics) of the Human Genomics Strategy Group (HGSG) that provided the evidence and recommendations for the Department of Health’s Genomics Review in 2012, and continues to work with the group to ensure their recommendations are delivered. Angela is a member of the Genomics England Rare Diseases Working Group and advises on the development of Protocols for the GMC Projects.  Angela is a member of the Department of Health’s UK Rare Disease Advisory Group, and has just completed a term of office as Chair of the RCPath Genetics and Reproductive Medicine Scientific Advisory Committee and was the RCPath Scientific Workforce Lead. After having chaired the Cheshire and Merseyside HCS Network for 10 years, Angela was appointed as the NW Lead Scientist and worked with NHS E, HEE, the AHSNs and the AHCS, supporting Healthcare Science disciplines, including Genetics and Bioinformatics across the NW.  Angela was previously seconded to a National role to ensure safe and sustainable Healthcare Science Diagnostic Services across England as a Specialist Advisor to the office of the CSO at NHS E. In 2014, Angela was named in the HSJ as one of UKs top 50 Inspirational Women Leaders, in 2015 was awarded Healthcare Scientist of the Year by NHS E, and in 2016 was honored in the Queens 90th Birthday Honors list as a Member of the Order of the British Empire for Research and Mentoring Students.

 

See the abstract for Angela Douglas' talk here

 

 
Professor Andrew Nisbet

Professor Andrew Nisbet, Head of Medical Physics, Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust. Professor Nisbet holds a joint post between the Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and Surrey University, where he is Head of the Medical Physics Department and Honorary Professor of Medical Physics respectively. In his current hospital role he provides management and scientific leadership to over 100 staff within the Department of Medical Physics, which provides medical physics services to over 300 NHS and non-NHS Healthcare Providers. He also works one day a week for the National Physical Laboratory on developing links with Industry. He has collaborated extensively with numerous partners covering NHS and non-NHS healthcare providers, medical industry, national and international bodies, academic collaborators and patient and public representatives. He is due to take up appointment as Professor and Head of the Department of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering at University College London from the start of the 2019/20 Academic year.

 

 
Dr Richard Speight  

Dr Richard Speight works as a MPE in the radiotherapy imaging physics team at the Leeds Cancer Centre. His position is funded by Cancer Research UK (ARTNET) and has research interests involving the role of MRI in radiotherapy. This includes image registration between MRI and CT (a topic he has authored a chapter on in a Springer text book entitled “MRI for Radiotherapy - planning, delivery and response assessment”) and MRI-only radiotherapy (a topic he is currently co-supervising 2 PhD students on). He is the chair of an IPEM working group entitled “MR simulation for external beam RT” and as part of this group he is involved in producing guidance on how to safely implement MRI in the radiotherapy pathway and with auditing the current landscape of MRI in radiotherapy in 10 countries.

 

See the abstract for Richard Speight's talk here.
           

 
Louise Murray

Louise studied Medicine at the University of Aberdeen. She completed her House Officer jobs and initial Oncology training in Aberdeen, before relocating to Sheffield to train in Clinical Oncology. After her exams, she completed a PhD in technical radiotherapy at Leeds Cancer Centre and the University of Leeds. Louise then spent one year in Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, focusing on radiotherapy for brain and paediatric tumours. She now works in Leeds Cancer Centre in a part-academic, part-NHS position. Her research interests include the appropriate implementation of new radiotherapy technologies in the clinic, re-irradiation and functional imaging. In her spare time Louise enjoys running and came third in the annual Toronto Monster Dash (a 10 kilometre race in fancy dress) while working in Canada. This success may have been due to the fact that all the really good runners don’t compete in fancy dress races!

 

See the abstract for Louise Murray's talk here.

                 
 
Mark Hardy

Mark is a radiation protection advisor and team leader of the radiotherapy radiation protection team at the Christie Hospital in Manchester. He has been involved in the design and build of the Christie proton centre since the project started in 2014. He has advised on many other radiotherapy room designs and operational aspects of all modalities of radiotherapy. He was a co-author of the proton therapy chapter of the second edition of IPEM report 75: Design and Shielding of Radiotherapy Treatment Techniques, as well as contributing to the IPEM special topical report 1 on flattening filter free radiotherapy, writing about radiation protection aspects of this new technology. He is also a Medical Physics Expert, specialising in treatment planning and has held teaching positions for the University of Sydney and North Coast Cancer Centre in Australia, as well as teaching at the University of Manchester and University of Cumbria in the UK. He is also a student himself, participating in the Higher Specialist Scientist Training programme.

 

See the abstract for Mark Hardy's talk here.

 

 
Dr Mark Gooding

Dr Gooding obtained his DPhil in Medical Imaging from University of Oxford in 2004. He was employed as a postdoctoral researcher both in university and NHS settings, where his focus was largely around women’s health. In 2009, he joined Mirada Medical, motivated by a desire to see technical innovation translated into clinical practice. While there, he has worked on a broad spectrum of clinical applications, developing algorithms and products for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. If given a free choice of research topic, his passion is for improving image segmentation, but in practice he is keen to address any technical challenge. Dr Gooding now leads the research team at Mirada, where in addition to the commercial work he continues to collaborate both clinically and academically.

           

 

See the abstract for Mark Gooding's talk here.

 

 
Gail Distefano  

Gail Distefano completed an MSc in Medical Physics at the University of Aberdeen in 2002. She worked at Clatterbridge Cancer Centre (2003-2010), where she gained her first experience of Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR). In 2010, she took up a post at the Royal Surrey County Hospital where she leads in the development and implementation of innovative treatments for Lung and Liver SABR.  Her continued interest in SABR led to her becoming QA Lead (2012-2018) of the UK SABR Consortium during which time she co-led a national Lung SABR dosimetry audit.   She is currently co-chair of the QA sub-group and has recently published results of a 2018 Survey on UK SABR implementation and current practices. Gail has recently started a 3-year NIHR Doctorate research fellowship focussing on tumour motion during Lung SABR.

In 2018 she was awarded the Chief Scientific Officer (CSO) Women in Science and Engineering (WISE) Fellowship. This opportunity has allowed her to develop her leadership abilities further, learn how to better communicate her scientific ideas and benefit from the mentorship of senior leaders. These new skills have enabled her to influence key directional decision and highlight the contributions of Healthcare Scientists to clinically driven research and development, something she is extremely passionate about.

 

See the abstract for Gail's talk here.


 
Nana Odom MSc

Nana Odom has 10 years’ experience working in various clinical engineering roles in the NHS.  She works collaboratively across multi-disciplinary professions to find innovative approaches to advancing patient care by applying engineering and managerial skills to medical equipment technology. She has a BSc in Physics with medical physics option (Ghana), MSc Biomedical Engineering (UK) and currently on the Higher Specialist Scientist Training (HSST) Scheme.

Her areas of interest include digital technology in acute care settings, its impact due to increased cyber threats, and the use of assistive technology to reduce or remove barriers faced by inpatients. Her area of scientific leadership is to develop a new breed of female healthcare scientist making an impact in inter-disciplinary teams to contribute to patient care.

Nana is one of the four successful candidates to be awarded the prestigious 2018 Chief Scientific Officer’s Women in Science and Engineering Fellowship.  She tells her story as full time working mum of 3 under 10year olds, to inspire the next generation and empower other women especially in STEM.

 

See the abstract for Nana's talk here.

 

 
Dr Richard Scott, BSc, MSc, PhD, CEng, MIET, CSci, FIPEM  

Richard is Head of Clinical Engineering at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, a 2000 bed teaching hospital in South Yorkshire, England.  The service, comprising 80 engineering staff, manages the  healthcare technologies in the Trust as well as undertaking research and development activities involving novel investigational clinical devices.

 

An electronics engineer by background Richard has 36 years experience working in the UK National Health Service, he is a Chartered Engineer and HCPC registered Clinical Scientist.  Richard’s PhD research was in the assessment of respiratory mechanics and current research interests are in the application of digital signal processing techniques to the analysis of physiological signals.  In 2017 Richard co-authored a book on Healthcare Technology Management, laying out a vision for a systematic approach for engineering staff in supporting and advancing care, through effective use of technology.            

 

 

Richard is active in training of the NHS clinical engineering workforce, working with the UK National School of Healthcare Science. Additionally he is active in the development of electo-medical safety standards and is currently Chair of IEC SC62A, (common aspects of electrical equipment used in medical practice) and BSI committee CH\100, (Healthcare and Medical Equipment). 

           

 
Robert Ross 

I’ve always been interested in physics, engineering and computing.  My undergrad degree is in Physical Sciences from the Open University.  A module on CT scanner technology lead me to find a Master’s degree in Medical Physics Computing, combining my interests.  I’ve worked in the NHS for 10 years, currently as the computing lead clinical scientist in a radiotherapy physics department.  I was on IPEM’s Informatics & Computing Special Interest Group committee for three years, and I’m involved in OSFAs for Bioinformatics (Health Informatics and Physical Sciences) STP trainees.  I’m always looking for opportunities to improve quality and innovate, particularly using computing technology, to reduce errors and improve efficiency.

           

I will be discussing the role of clinical and scientific computing in medical physics.  I will discuss the essential skills a clinical scientist in medical physics specialities (nuclear medicine, radiotherapy, nonionizing radiation) is likely to need, how these roles are similar and different to bioinformatics roles, and some of the challenges and opportunities for the future computing requirements of the department.

 


  


Jo Gander

CaPA Director, Supply Chain Coordination Limited Management Function of NHS Supply Chain

Jo recently joined the Team and has over 30 years healthcare experience.

Jo initially started out as a Registered General Nurse, then in medical devices and pharmaceuticals organisations in a range of roles from sales, marketing, clinical and general management. She has also worked locally and regionally within the NHS as a commissioning group director within a Care Trust and more recently as a senior programme lead within NHS England National Team.


Alys Gilbert

Following completion of a MEng in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Sheffield, Alys started the Clinical Scientist Training Scheme based in the East Midlands Training Consortium, successfully registering as a Clinical Scientist in 2013.

As a Clinical Engineer at Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Alys is involved in many aspects of Clinical Engineering, from procurement evaluations, incident investigations and service developments. This experience helped Alys secure a position in the first cohort of the new Higher Specialist Scientist Training (HSST) Scheme in 2014 in Clinical Biomedical Engineering.

Alys is currently halfway through the HSST programme, following a break in 2016/17 for Maternity leave. It is hoped research will be carried out as part of this programme to support the development of local rehabilitation services through use of assistive technology and other new device innovations.

Outside of work, the majority of Alys’ time is spent with her family, with her 1 year old daughter making sure she is always kept busy!


Jo Gander

CaPA Director, Supply Chain Coordination Limited Management Function of NHS Supply Chain

Jo recently joined the Team and has over 30 years healthcare experience.

Jo initially started out as a Registered General Nurse, then in medical devices and pharmaceuticals organisations in a range of roles from sales, marketing, clinical and general management. She has also worked locally and regionally within the NHS as a commissioning group director within a Care Trust and more recently as a senior programme lead within NHS England National Team.


Alys Gilbert

Following completion of a MEng in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Sheffield, Alys started the Clinical Scientist Training Scheme based in the East Midlands Training Consortium, successfully registering as a Clinical Scientist in 2013.

As a Clinical Engineer at Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Alys is involved in many aspects of Clinical Engineering, from procurement evaluations, incident investigations and service developments. This experience helped Alys secure a position in the first cohort of the new Higher Specialist Scientist Training (HSST) Scheme in 2014 in Clinical Biomedical Engineering.

Alys is currently halfway through the HSST programme, following a break in 2016/17 for Maternity leave. It is hoped research will be carried out as part of this programme to support the development of local rehabilitation services through use of assistive technology and other new device innovations.

Outside of work, the majority of Alys’ time is spent with her family, with her 1 year old daughter making sure she is always kept busy!


Jo Gander

CaPA Director, Supply Chain Coordination Limited Management Function of NHS Supply Chain

Jo recently joined the Team and has over 30 years healthcare experience.

Jo initially started out as a Registered General Nurse, then in medical devices and pharmaceuticals organisations in a range of roles from sales, marketing, clinical and general management. She has also worked locally and regionally within the NHS as a commissioning group director within a Care Trust and more recently as a senior programme lead within NHS England National Team.


Alys Gilbert

Following completion of a MEng in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Sheffield, Alys started the Clinical Scientist Training Scheme based in the East Midlands Training Consortium, successfully registering as a Clinical Scientist in 2013.

As a Clinical Engineer at Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Alys is involved in many aspects of Clinical Engineering, from procurement evaluations, incident investigations and service developments. This experience helped Alys secure a position in the first cohort of the new Higher Specialist Scientist Training (HSST) Scheme in 2014 in Clinical Biomedical Engineering.

Alys is currently halfway through the HSST programme, following a break in 2016/17 for Maternity leave. It is hoped research will be carried out as part of this programme to support the development of local rehabilitation services through use of assistive technology and other new device innovations.

Outside of work, the majority of Alys’ time is spent with her family, with her 1 year old daughter making sure she is always kept busy!


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